Breaking & World News! III NO DISCUSSION!!

Discussion in 'Members' Club Room' started by bd popeye, Nov 1, 2014.

  1. Hendrik_2000
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    Hendrik_2000 Brigadier

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    Correct I think Beijing still wait for the sign of open rebellion to justify the crack down but the clock is ticking fast
    I have no doubt that NGO, Western agent, Church official are rubbing their hand in glee at the prospect of open rebellion with the complicity of young thug who is now intoxicating with sense of power due to vacillating and indecisive Hongkong government .

    But I do follow TAM tragedy blow by blow the same thing happened before and these young thug refuse to compromise And the central government wait for 2 or 3 months no change then they move with gangbusters
    Casualty taken and The west with Japan and Korea boycott China when she is at ill can afford it But if china is willing to pay the price back then what prevent if to do it now since China influence and profile has gone so much over the year
    Boycott can never last.After TAM the western world Boycott China only Overseas Chinese stood by China LKY said China did the right thing and history will be the judge. Singapore stood by China then and keep the cooperation together with overseas Chinese they break the back of the boycott.

    It will negatively affect the election in Taiwan but the idea of peaceful reunification is a pipe dream anyway. China might as well give it up. It will never happened they better live with it and prepare for not so peaceful reunification
    But if you start challenge the sanctity of the nation state they will be dealt harshly whether they are Uyghur or Han Chinese
    This is what will happened if these young thug does not stop the madness blood will be on the street

    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/what-if-chinas-military-enters-hong-kong
    The deployment of Chinese military police forces to the city of Shenzhen, just outside of Hong Kong, indicates Chinese President Xi Jinping's movement towards crushing the Hong Kong "Umbrella" protests. As I noted on Tuesday, the protesters' seizure of Hong Kong's international airport would appear to have crossed a red line for Beijing.


    But what happens if Xi does send in the military? What will follow?

    First, the military would probably wait to see if the presence of the People's Armed Police on Hong Kong streets would be enough to deter the protesters. Beijing's hope would be to end the protest movement or at least dramatically reduce its energy by the threat of using force.

    But that gambit is unlikely to succeed. The Umbrella Movement has been emboldened by a sense that the authorities lack the resolve and capacity to crush them. It is likely that the protesters will want to challenge China's willingness to use force.

    If they do, the People's Armed Police will take escalated action. Recently reorganized under the command of the Central Military Commission in Beijing, the military police have both the authority and support to act decisively. Their deployment to Shenzhen is notable both for its presentation of physical threat and also its indication of Xi's personal direction. This is not a regionally authorized or directed deployment to simply support the Hong Kong police. In other terms, think of this as the deployment of the 101st Airborne Division rather than a National Guard unit. If the military police does enter Hong Kong, its effort will be integrated with the People's Liberation Army Southern Theater Command headquarters and China's MSS civilian intelligence service.

    What then? First, the military police will likely enter the airport to restore public control over the situation. In effort to deter the protests from continuing, the military police will likely act with significant use of force. It will then move to secure areas of Hong Kong that have been targeted by the protesters. Any surge in protester violence will then be crushed quickly and relentlessly. Note here that Chinese military doctrine is focused on securing the visible supremacy of the Chinese Communist Party. It is thus feasible that the military might remove protest leaders from Hong Kong to the mainland.

    Yet the key point here is that once the military is deployed, Beijing will be fully committed to victory. The Central Military Commission will be keenly aware of international attention to its military action. It will not want to encourage any perception abroad of its hesitation in the moment of action, in fear of emboldening actors such as the United States to more resolute resistance of China's foreign policy expansionism.

    In short, there will be blood.
     
    #3161 Hendrik_2000, Aug 13, 2019 at 4:24 PM
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2019 at 4:36 PM
  2. Quickie
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    Quickie Captain

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    Sending in the troops is way over disproportionate. A more proportionate response would be to start arresting the culprits for breaking the law.

    Illegal assembly at the airport and disrupting its operation is already breaking the law and is enough reason for the Hong Kong authorities to start taking more forceful action like rounding up the culprits and making the arrest.
     
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  3. manqiangrexue
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    manqiangrexue Captain

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    Then what? You arrest a couple of people, next week, they gather again. Meanwhile, they host riots outside of the jailhouse throwing bricks at the police while the police use pepper spray. These people aren't scared of HK police and can't be controlled by HK police because they were given too many freedoms with authority being too lax in HK. When the PLA comes in there with tanks and assault rifles, they will know that they are staring into the eyes of the Grim Reaper and they will not be saved by their numbers. Then the problem becomes whether or not you allow them to disperse and go home. If you do, now you have tens of thousands of likely terrorists hidden in the population that wish to be pawns and take missions from the CIA on how to undermine their own country. If you do, that is...
     
    #3163 manqiangrexue, Aug 13, 2019 at 4:41 PM
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2019 at 5:00 PM
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  4. Gatekeeper
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    Gatekeeper Junior Member
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  5. Equation
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    Equation Lieutenant General

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    Meh...too small in numbers to make any kind of significant dent to a much larger Chinese population. Their only hope is to move to Taiwan island and raise their anger over there instead. Even that is not guarantee as there a significant number in Taiwan island wants unification with the mainland as well.
     
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  6. manqiangrexue
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    manqiangrexue Captain

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    Well that's the whole point of terrorism; just a small number of people can have a terrible effect.

    Meanwhile, on the Chinese news, a HK independence advocate went to the ROC with a banner calling for founding an independent country from China. A Taiwanese citizen reportedly slapped him down to the ground where he began to roll around and cry.
     
  7. supercat
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    supercat Junior Member

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    The airport protest is over for now.

    https://news.yahoo.com/hong-kong-airport-resumes-flights-235641121.html

    Personally, I don't think China will send in the PAP. It's simply not necessary at this point. Sending in PAP is the last resort. First of all, the protesters probably do not have majority support even in Hong Kong, as the anti-protest petition demonstrates:

    http://www.thestandard.com.hk/section-news.php?id=208445

    Secondly, The Chinese and Hong Kong governments have quite a few other options at their dispersal. For example, China can cause more economic pain in Hong Kong by banning mainland tourism. 5 million mainland tourists visit Hong Kong each month. The loss of this revenue (3.9% of Hong Kong's GDP) may push Hong Kong's GDP growth into negative territory and causes a recession. That will surely turn many more Hongkongers against the protests. China can also threatens to cut off the Hong Kong stock market from the Shanghai stock market, which will even scare some of the stock owning Hong Kong elites, like what happened in 2014.

    Finally, the Hong Kong government can issue emergency regulations and grant special power to the police, so they can take more decisive actions. Remember, the Hong Kong police force has been very restrained so far, unlike the police force that was under British rule, who opened fire on and killed stone-throwing protesters in 1967.
     
    #3167 supercat, Aug 13, 2019 at 9:56 PM
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2019 at 10:10 PM
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  8. PanAsian
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    PanAsian Major

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    The Hong Kong police has been extremely restrained and the restraint paid off in having the hardline protesters prove themselves bigoted and violent and the hardline political opposition prove themselves liars, traitors, some having no control over their purported supporters in ensuring peaceful behavior, and some complicit in provoking violence. The Hong Kong government and police need to do a much better PR job in calling out these facts and countering misinformation by these groups, hostile foreign meddlers, and biased anti-government media, including arresting and prosecuting many more of these guilty parties. However it is important to note that these hardline anti-government elements are a small portion of the Hong Kong population and it is counter-productive and unnecessary to punish or sacrifice Hong Kong as a whole.

    At the same time the Hong Kong government needs to show much stronger public appreciation, rally political and popular support for the police; proactively tackle the colonialist legacy of self-racism/anti-Chinese prejudice among the population; make the tough choices to address chronic acute pocketbook problems such as housing unaffordability, lack of opportunity/low wages relative to the cost of living, and tunnel vision parenting and systemic education/developmental shortcomings for young people; and develop and promote a clear vision for Hong Kong's future as a thriving part of a successful China.

    The central Chinese authorities can and should do more to help with many of these efforts, especially in terms of converging them with national priorities and the national vision without making Hong Kong people feel anonymously absorbed. Then again the central Chinese authorities have the same communication and PR weaknesses as the Hong Kong authorities, maybe even more so. This should be a massive learning opportunity for both Hong Kong and central Chinese authorities, including in cyber warfare as a lot of anti-government misinformation and conspiring in organizing the violent protests takes place online.
     
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  9. manqiangrexue
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    manqiangrexue Captain

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    I was discussing this with my girlfriend who is from Hong Kong and in Hong Kong now and she says it's obvious why the PLA have not stepped in yet. The riots are not at all what the Western media has portrayed. As a matter of fact, I was shocked to hear these things from her. First of all, there are many children, barely in their teens, who don't really know why they are there. I've never seen that in the Western media. Then, she says a lot of the ranks of these rioters are made of low level mercenaries being paid to riot. And fractures are starting to show because they are not getting paid as they were promised and rioters are starting to get angry in their internal ranks. As a matter of fact, the Chinese government is moving to further cut off their funding sources. She says it's obvious to her and the majority of the people in Hong Kong that foreigners have teamed up with traitors to foment this unrest and that the majority of rioters are just confused Chinese people being roped into it. That's why it's clear that for now, this situation requires a more tactical and softer touch rather than one of military power. I did not know any of that. By reading the Western news, I was led to believe that Hong Kong was made in large of die-hard traitors for whom there is no hope left...
     
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  10. Shaolian
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    Shaolian Junior Member
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    Thanks, that's reassuring news indeed. I've been reading and watching the news, and these rioters gives off a somewhat jarring or peculiar demeanor, especially when they'd like us to think of them as revolutionary fighters, or at the very least radicalised violent nuts. When they are at the receiving end or been confronted by a stronger force, for example when the White Shirts were dealing them the beatings, or when some of them were been arrested/roughen by the police, they seem to be quickly begging/asking for forgiveness, even crying. Doesn't look too nuts to me.
     
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