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Russian military news thread

This is a discussion on Russian military news thread within the World Armed Forces forums, part of the World Strategic Defence Area category; IL-38 at Yelizovo Kamchatka also. IL-38.jpg...

  1. #601
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    Re: Russian military news thread

    IL-38 at Yelizovo Kamchatka also.

    IL-38.jpg

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    Re: Russian military news thread

    One beautiful diagram for Oscar II

    Oscar.jpg
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    Re: Russian military news thread



    Pace Of Russian Rearmament Quickens
    By Maxim Pyadushkin
    Source: Aviation Week & Space Technology

    December 16, 2013
    Credit: Sukhoi
    A massive modernization push is imminent for Russian aerospace defense: The air force alone could receive 4.5 trillion rubles ($136 billion) over 10 years, about one-quarter of the overall drive to upgrade Russia's Soviet-era weaponry.

    The money will help replace about 70% of the air force fleet by 2020 and position it to acquire the Sukhoi T-50—a fighter advanced enough to rival the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter—as well as a stealthy, long-range bomber, and to overhaul its surface-to-air missile stockpile. However, analysts caution that the plan's financial scope may be unrealistic.

    For now, the investments are on track. During a series of briefings by military officials and defense manufacturers in late November, Russian President Vladimir Putin approved the procurement program adopted in 2010. The meetings amounted to the first public audit of the program to ensure that the investments are on track—a domestic show of support for the Russian defense industry, despite the country's economic stagnation.

    The list includes accelerating replacement of old aircraft in the air force fleet. Putin has announced that the military will have received 86 new and, modernized fixed-wing aircraft and more than 100 new helicopters this year, and will take delivery of up to 120 fixed-wing aircraft and 90 helicopters in 2014. In 2011 and 2012, just 263 new aircraft were delivered to the military units.

    By 2020, the air force aims to have a total of 1,600 new aircraft, renewing about 70% of its fleet.

    So far, the air force's orderbook consists of Sukhoi Su-34 fighter-bombers and Su-30M2/SM and Su-35 multirole fighters. In 2014, the air force plans to rearm one air regiment with the Su-34s, according to Defense Minister Sergey Shoigu. A training air base in Borisoglebsk is to be reequipped with Yakovlev Yak-130 jet trainers; 18 of the type were delivered in 2013, out of 55 ordered.

    According to the head of the United Aircraft Corp. (UAC), Mikhail Pogosyan, the Sukhoi T-50 will start official evaluation tests with the air force in 2014. The first phase of these trials is expected to be completed in 2015, he says. The five prototypes involved in the preliminary test program have logged more than 450 flights. The Russian defense ministry issued technical requirements for the future long-range bomber to the corporation in September. “We are now at the stage of drawing up the contracts to start the full-scale development of this aircraft beginning next year,” Pogosyan says.

    The air force expects the stealthy bomber aircraft, to be developed under the PAK DA program, to replace its current strategic bomber fleet of Tupolev Tu-160 Blackjacks, Tu-95 Bears and Tu-22M3 Backfires by 2025-30. Meanwhile, the veteran bombers are being upgraded with new avionics and airborne weapons. UAC completed factory testing of the upgraded versions of the Tu-160 and Tu-95 and is handing them over for the official trials.

    The procurement program also calls for enhanced air transport capabilities for the air force. In November, UAC completed the first phase of official tests of the Il-76MD-90A, a much modernized Ilyushin Il-76 heavy transport aircraft. During this phase, the aircraft completed 38 flights, including tests at the maximum takeoff and landing weights (210 tons and 170 tons, respectively). The air force has 39 transports on order; the modifications will be done in Russia, although the older variants were manufactured in Uzbekistan. Pogosyan has promised that deliveries will start next year. The UAC has begun development of medium transport aircraft as a joint program with India and completed the detailed design of a new light transport, Pogosyan says.

    Meanwhile, the aerospace defense troops are being reequipped with the S-400 (SA-21 Growler) long-range air defense and anti-ballistic missile systems. Two units of these surface-to-air missiles (SAM) were delivered this year and three more are to be deployed in 2014, Putin says.

    S-400 manufacturer Almaz-Antey is working on a next-generation system, the S-500, that will undergo intensive trials in 2014-15, says the company's chief designer, Pavel Sozinov.

    The aging S-300PT and PS (SA-10 Grumble), the most common air defense missiles in the force, will be replaced by new S-350 Vityaz medium-range mobile SAMs unveiled this summer. Sozinov says official trials will be conducted during 2014 and deliveries could start in 2015-16.

    The aerospace defense troops' missile capabilities will be supported by expansion of the early-warning radar network. The service operates three Voronezh modular radar stations and plans to deploy seven more in the next five years.

    Defense experts are quite skeptical of the rearmament program's feasibility, however. “Even if the program is properly financed, it is unlikely to be fully implemented, as the required modernization of defense industry facilities and the respective regulatory environment lag behind,” says Konstantin Makienko, deputy director of the Center for Analysis of Strategies and Technologies, a Moscow-based defense think tank.
    Last edited by TerraN_EmpirE; 08-05-2014 at 05:56 PM.
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    Re: Russian military news thread

    Quote Originally Posted by FORBIN View Post
    One beautiful diagram for Oscar II

    Oscar.jpg
    What was it about the Oscars that the Russians needed to build a submarine that's actually bigger than the Ohio SSBN which carried the same number of much bigger and heavier missiles?
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    Re: Russian military news thread

    Quote Originally Posted by shen View Post
    What was it about the Oscars that the Russians needed to build a submarine that's actually bigger than the Ohio SSBN which carried the same number of much bigger and heavier missiles?
    The Oscar II was an SSGN, with a double hull.

    The Russians had to build it that big to get their huge missiles in there.

    The Ohio was built to be an SSBN, with nuclear intercontinental ballistic missiles. Because of one of the treaties reducing numbers of warheads, 4 of the SSBN Ohio were converted to SSGN to carry 154 conventional Tomahawk missiles.
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    Re: Russian military news thread

    Now confirmed the 32 SH-11 ABM-4 Gorgon are retired, the more big, remains 64 SH-08 ABM-3 Gazelle, around Moscow, 9th div BMD in 5 sites.
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    Re: Russian military news thread

    Quote Originally Posted by shen View Post
    What was it about the Oscars that the Russians needed to build a submarine that's actually bigger than the Ohio SSBN which carried the same number of much bigger and heavier missiles?
    Itz specific duty was to hunt the US CBG with those 24 Granit missiles. The Oscars were carrier killers. These subs are going to be upgraded and during upgrade Oniks missiles will replace those 24 Granits. The speculated number is 3 Oniks per Granit which totals to 72 missiles.

    I uploaded anew avtaar - 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics mascot - Amur Leapord, but it is not getting diaplayed?
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    Re: Russian military news thread

    Quote Originally Posted by TerraN_EmpirE View Post
    it looks to me like the model and the artist concept have alot in common the double tails swing wings engine placement blended wing the key differences being longer wings, angled tails, and a more traditionally shaped nose.
    I dont see much similarity to the artist concept. If anything, it is more closer to the Tu-160 till the mid fuselage. Its from the mid-section that we see real changes with the (absence of) twin-podded engines (as seen on Tu-160) getting flushed with the (wider) fuselage, engine intakes on the upper fuselage and the twin slanted stablizers.







    The fuselage as such is also chubbier than the Tu-160.
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    Russia moved nuclear-capable Iskander missiles closer to EU borders

    Russian missile deployment raises alarm



    Moscow (AFP) - Washington has joined Russia's neighbours in voicing alarm after Moscow revealed it had moved nuclear-capable Iskander missiles closer to EU borders in response to the US-led deployment of a disputed air defence shield.

    The advanced version of the Russian missile has a range of 500 kilometres (310 miles) and could potentially be used to take out ground-based radar and interceptors of the new NATO shield.

    Moscow's announcement Monday prompted concern from the United States as well as neighbouring Poland and three Baltic states -- Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia.

    "We've urged Russia to take no steps to destabilize the region," State Department deputy spokeswoman Marie Harf said in response, adding the US had also passed on to Moscow its neighbours' concerns.

    Poland's foreign ministry called the planned missile movement "disturbing".

    "This is a matter for NATO and we can expect possible consultations and action... at the NATO and EU level," the ministry added in a statement.

    Latvia's Defence Minister Artis Pabriks said that "several Baltic cities" were threatened by the move.

    "It is clear that it is alarming news as it is one of the arguments changing balance of powers in our region," he said, according to the Baltic News Service (BNS).

    Germany's Bild newspaper first reported over the weekend that Russia had deployed about 10 Iskander systems in its Kaliningrad exclave -- wedged between Poland and Lithuania -- at some point in the past year.

    A top Russian defence official said in response to the report that several Iskander batteries had been stationed in Russia's Western Military District -- a region that includes the exclave and also borders the three Baltic nations that were once a part of the USSR.

    "Iskander operational-tactical missile systems have indeed been commissioned by the Western Military District's missile and artillery forces," Russian news agencies quoted defence ministry spokesman Igor Konashenkov as saying.

    He added that Russia's deployment "does not violate any international treaties or agreements" and should therefore not be subject to protests from the West.

    The Kremlin warned in 2011 that it could station the short- and medium-range ballistic missiles along the European Union's eastern frontier in response to NATO's missile defence programme.

    Both the United States and the Western military alliance have argued that the shield is not aimed at Russia but is designed to protect the West from potential threats from so-called "rogue states".

    But Moscow fears the system -- whose components include missile-positioning satellites -- may one day be turned into an offensive weapon that targets Russian soil.

    Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov has said that a deal with Tehran to curb its suspect nuclear program would make the NATO shield unnecessary.

    But US Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel told his Russian counterpart Sergei Shoigu on Monday that a preliminary nuclear deal with Iran "does not eliminate the need" for the NATO shield.

    "Hagel stressed that US and NATO missile defense efforts pose no threat to Russia and urged that both sides continue consultations on future missile plans in Europe," the Pentagon said in a statement.

    A report prepared by the US-based Stratfor global intelligence consultancy and published by the WikiLeaks website said most Iskander missiles had previously been stationed in Siberia and the volatile North Caucasus region.

    Stratfor added that the long-mooted Kaliningrad move "is highly political, since (the Iskander) could reach into Germany or take out any American (ballistic missile defence) system".

    The advanced version of the missile -- known as the Iskander-M -- was one of Russia's first major post-Soviet weapons and is now among its most prized military exports.

    "The Iskander is a type of weapon that could influence the military and political situations in certain regions of the world," Russia's state-owned ITAR-TASS news agency said.

    But military analysts said cash constraints have prevented the armed forces from deploying as many Iskander systems as originally hoped.

    Stratfor estimated that only 60 Iskanders will have been "produced and implemented" by 2015 -- far too few to pose a serious threat to the West.

    The analysts added that the Kremlin appears to be trying to use the threat of a potential attack to influence public opinion against the NATO defence shield in nations such as Poland.

    "What they are doing resembles a propaganda campaign," said military affairs writer Pavel Felgenhauer. "They hope that the Poles will get frightened and come out against the deployment of US rockets."

    But Alexander Konovalov of Moscow's Institute Strategic Assessment said the decision to deploy Iskanders closer to EU borders could leave Russia exposed in far more dangerous regions along its southern and eastern flanks.

    "If they move all the Iskanders to the west, there will not be enough left to protect our southern and eastern borders, where they are really needed," Konovalov said.


    Very interesting development here in Eastern Europe, this is why I loved Putin, when he says he will do something he really do it
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    Re: Russian military news thread

    Great video of Borei class SSBN performing an emergency surface during trials.




    These are very large vessels, displacing 24,000 tons. Here's a still image of the Borei Class:



    Last edited by Jeff Head; 12-22-2013 at 11:07 PM.
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  11. #611
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    Re: Russian military news thread



    You either love him or hate him, but he did created one helluva assault rifle! RIP Mr. Kalashnikov.

    Rifle designer Mikhail Kalashnikov dead at 94

    MOSCOW (AP) — Mikhail Kalashnikov, whose work as a weapons designer for the Soviet Union is immortalized in the name of the world's most popular firearm, died Monday at the age of 94.

    Kalashnikov once aspired to design farm equipment. But even though his most famous invention — the AK-47 assault rifle — sowed havoc instead of crops, he often said he felt personally untroubled by his contribution to bloodshed.

    "I sleep well. It's the politicians who are to blame for failing to come to an agreement and resorting to violence," he said in 2007.

    Kalashnikov died in a hospital in Izhevsk, the capital of the Udmurtia republic where he lived, said Viktor Chulkov, a spokesman for the republic's president. He did not give a cause of death. Kalashnikov had been hospitalized for the past month with unspecified health problems.

    The AK-47 — "Avtomat Kalashnikov" and the year it went into production — is the world's most popular firearm, favored by guerrillas, terrorists and the soldiers of many armies. An estimated 100 million guns are spread worldwide.

    Though it isn't especially accurate, its ruggedness and simplicity are exemplary: it performs in sandy or wet conditions that jam more sophisticated weapons such as the U.S. M-16.

    "During the Vietnam war, American soldiers would throw away their M-16s to grab AK-47s and bullets for it from dead Vietnamese soldiers," Kalashnikov said in July 2007 at a ceremony marking the rifle's 60th anniversary.

    The weapon's suitability for jungle and desert fighting made it nearly ideal for the Third World insurgents backed by the Soviet Union, and Moscow not only distributed the AK-47 widely but also licensed its production in some 30 other countries.

    The gun's status among revolutionaries and national-liberation struggles is enshrined on the flag of Mozambique.

    Kalashnikov, born into a peasant family in Siberia, began his working life as a railroad clerk. After he joined the Red Army in 1938, he began to show mechanical flair by inventing several modifications for Soviet tanks.

    The moment that firmly set his course was in the 1941 battle of Bryansk against Nazi forces, when a shell hit his tank. Recovering from wounds in the hospital, Kalashnikov brooded about the superior automatic rifles he'd seen the Nazis deploy; his rough ideas and revisions bore fruit five years later.

    "Blame the Nazi Germans for making me become a gun designer," said Kalashnikov. "I always wanted to construct agricultural machinery."

    In 2007, President Vladimir Putin praised him, saying "The Kalashnikov rifle is a symbol of the creative genius of our people."

    Over his career, he was decorated with numerous honors, including the Hero of Socialist Labor and Order of Lenin and Stalin Prize. But because his invention was never patented, he didn't get rich off royalties.

    "At that time in our country patenting inventions wasn't an issue. We worked for Socialist society, for the good of the people, which I never regret," he once said.

    Kalashnikov continued working into his late 80s as chief designer of the Izmash company that first built the AK-47. He also traveled the world helping Russia negotiate new arms deals, and he wrote books on his life, about arms and about youth education.

    "After the collapse of the great and mighty Soviet Union so much crap has been imposed on us, especially on the younger generation," he said. "I wrote six books to help them find their way in life."

    He said he was proud of his bronze bust installed in his native village of Kurya in the Siberian region of Altai. He said newlyweds bring flowers to the bust. "They whisper 'Uncle Misha, wish us happiness and healthy kids,'" he said. "What other gun designer can boast of that?"
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    Re: Russian military news thread

    Dang! beat me to it.

    A Type One AK found in Laos.
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    Re: Russian military news thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Bose View Post
    I dont see much similarity to the artist concept. If anything, it is more closer to the Tu-160 till the mid fuselage. Its from the mid-section that we see real changes with the (absence of) twin-podded engines (as seen on Tu-160) getting flushed with the (wider) fuselage, engine intakes on the upper fuselage and the twin slanted stablizers.

    The fuselage as such is also chubbier than the Tu-160.
    Almost as handsome as the B1-B... the windows make a difference.

    rockwell-b-1-lancer_small.jpg
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    Re: Russian military news thread

    so does difference in capability as Tu-160 carries almost double the payload at 40 tonnes.
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    Re: Russian military news thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Bose View Post
    so does difference in capability as Tu-160 carries almost double the payload at 40 tonnes.
    The TU-160 is a significantly larger aircraft than the B-1B Lancer. Here are the comparisons between the two:

    TU-160 Blackjack Specifications:

    Length: 177'
    Wingspan (max): 183'
    Height: 43'
    Range: 7,640 miles
    Top Speed: 1,400 mph
    Wing Area: 4,000 sq.ft.
    Service Ceiling: 50,000 ft.
    Payload:
    2 x internal bays for 88,000 lbs (internal)

    B-1B Lancer:

    Length: 146'
    Wingspan (max): 137'
    Height: 34'
    Range: 6,480 miles
    Top Speed: 830 mph
    Wing Area: 1,950 sq.ft..
    Service Ceiling: 60,000 ft.
    Payload:
    3 x internal bays for 75,000 lbs (internal)
    6 x hardpoints for 50,000 lbs (external)
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